Bill to allow special education students make up lost time

Bill to allow special education students make up lost time

| Jul 14, 2021 | Education Law |

Parents of children who use special education services understand how valuable this education is for their New York student. Special education services are a right for children through high school, but the pandemic hit special education students especially hard. A recent bill signed into law is allowing special education students additional time to make up for the education they lost in the last year.

Governor Andrew Cuomo recently signed a bill that allows special education students more time to make up for school that was lost during the 2020 and 2021. The bill allows special education students to continue their public-school education until they turn 23. The previous age a special education student could stay in school was 21. Students who have Individualized Education Plans qualify for this extension. The law was created to help special education students whose educational and life-skills needs suffered during the pandemic. Parents who have children with an IEP should be proactive about contacting their student’s district in requesting these additional services.

Special kids need special attention

Parents of special education students know how difficult it can be to get the educational help their children need. Special needs kids require a specialized education plan to meet their needs. An attorney who specialized in education law can help their client ensure their child gets the best possible education. They can meet with parents and the school district to work through disagreements and create individualized education plans that allow for a student to receive the education that is their legal right.

Special education students have the legal right to a free and appropriate public education. Sometimes parents need additional help in order for their student to receive the best education allowed to them under the law. In these cases, an attorney can be an important advocate.